What Is A Selvage In Sewing?

In sewing, a selvage is the self-finished edge of fabric that prevents it from unraveling. The selvage is usually located on the lengthwise grain, or crosswise grain depending on the type of fabric. Different types of fabrics will have different types of selvages.

For example, woven fabrics will have a clean finished edge while knit fabrics will have a stretchy edge. Some fabrics even have decorative selvages! Knowing how to identify and use a selvage can be very helpful in sewing.

In some cases, you can even use the selvage as part of your seam allowance. This can be especially helpful when working with bias tape or binding.

What is the selvage? How to find the selvage edge of fabric? – Sewing terms and definitions

If you’re a sewer, you’ve probably heard the term “selvage” before. But what exactly is it? In short, the selvage is the edge of fabric that’s been finished by the manufacturer.

It’s usually located on either side of the fabric bolt and runs parallel to the grainline. Selvages often have decorative stitching or serging, and they can be used in a variety of ways in sewing projects. One common use for selvages is as binding on quilts or other types of Sewing Projects.

The Selvage prevents fraying at the edges of your project and gives it a nice, clean finish. You can also use selvages to make narrow strips for applique work or trimming. So next time you’re at the fabric store, take a closer look at those selvages!

They may just come in handy on your next sewing project!

What is Selvage

Selvage is the term used to describe the narrow, finished edge on a fabric bolt. It’s also referred to as self-edge or selvage edge. The selvage doesn’t ravel and is often sturdier than the rest of the fabric.

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You can usually find the selvage along both lengthwise edges of a piece of fabric. When you purchase yardage from a store, the salesperson will cut off the selvages before measuring out your fabric (unless you specifically ask for them). The selvage can be different on each side of the fabric bolt.

One side may have information printed on it such as the manufacturer, fiber content, care instructions, etc. The other side may be plain or have a design woven into it. If you’re new to sewing, you may be wondering why bother with those pesky selvages?

After all, they’re just extra bits of thread that get in the way, right? Wrong! Selvages actually serve several important purposes:

They help keep your fabric from unraveling. They make it easier to line up pattern pieces when cutting out your project (especially helpful with plaids and stripes). They can add stability and structure to certain types of projects like bags and quilts (more on that later).

All in all, selvages are pretty darn useful things – so don’t throw them away next time you’re prepping your fabric for a sewing project!

What Is A Selvage In Sewing?

Credit: www.thesprucecrafts.com

How Do You Find the Selvage of a Fabric?

If you’re new to sewing, you may be wondering what the selvage of a fabric is and how to find it. The selvage is the self-finished edge of a fabric that prevents it from unraveling. It’s usually located on both sides of the fabric and runs parallel to the lengthwise grain.

To find the selvage, simply run your hand along either side of the fabric until you feel a firm, finished edge.

What Does a Selvage Edge Look Like?

If you’re a sewer, you’ve probably heard of the term “selvage edge.” But what is it, exactly? Simply put, the selvage is the self-finished edge of fabric that prevents it from unraveling.

Selvages can be straight or serged and are usually located on the lengthwise grain (i.e., parallel to the selvage) of fabric bolts.

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Most fabrics have two selvages: one on each side of the fabric bolt. When you purchase fabric by the yard at a store, you typically cut off one selvage before cutting your desired lengths of fabric for your project.

This leaves you with one clean edge and one fray-checked edge on each side of your fabric piece. Some types of fabrics have only one selvage, while others may have as many as four! The type of finish on a selvage can vary depending on the fiber content and weight of the fabric.

For example, lightweight cottons often have serged edges, while heavier denim fabrics will have pinked or stitched edges to prevent fraying. Some specialty fabrics like lace or tulle may not have any finish at all on their selvages. To sum it up, a selvage is simply the finished edge on either side of a piece of fabric that helps to keep it from unraveling over time.

Next time you’re at your local craft store picking out materials for your next sewing project, take a closer look at those bolts o’ cloth and familiarize yourself with different types of selvages!

How Do You Use the Selvage of Fabric When Sewing?

The selvage of fabric is the self-finished edge that runs along both sides of a piece of fabric. The selvage cannot be unraveled and is often narrower than the rest of the fabric. When sewing, you can use the selvage as-is or cut it off.

If you choose to use the selvage, you can sew it right into your seam allowance. This will give your garment extra stability and prevent it from stretching out over time. You can also use the selvage to create bias tape or binding.

Bias tape is a strip of fabric that has been cut on the bias (diagonally across the grain). Binding is when you fold the bias tape in half and sew it around the edge of your garment. This gives a clean finish and prevents fraying.

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If you decide to cut off the selvage, you should do so before cutting any other pieces out of your fabric. This will help ensure that your fabric pieces are all cut with straight edges.

What is a Selvage in Clothing?

In sewing, a selvage is the edge of fabric that has been finished so that it will not unravel. The term comes from the fact that this edge is often left on the fabric as it comes off the loom, before it is cut into widths for use. Selvages are usually found on the lengthwise edges of a piece of fabric (the selvage).

Most often, selvages are narrow and have a zigzag stitch running along them. This prevents the fabric from fraying and makes it easier to sew with. Selvages can also be serged or pinked to achieve a similar goal.

Some types of fabrics, such as lace or knit fabrics, do not have selvages because they do not ravel. When cutting patterns out of fabric, you will often find that the instructions tell you to “cut on the fold.” This means that you should line up the fold line on your pattern with the selvage of the fabric and then cut along both at once.

This ensures that your pattern piece is exactly symmetrical and will save you some time in cutting.

Conclusion

A selvage is the term used in sewing for the edge of a fabric. Selvages are finished edges that keep your fabric from frayi A selvage is the term used in sewing for the edge of a fabric.

Selvages are finished edges that keep your fabric from fraying and unraveling. Most fabrics have selvages, but some do not. When you purchase fabric, the selvage is usually still attached.

You can tell if a fabric has a selvage because it will be straight and have a nice finish to it. If you look at a piece of fabric and see that the edge is unfinished or frayed, then it does not have a selvage.

Jane
Jane

Hi,
I’m Jane and I’m the editor of janesknittingkits.com! I am a long-time craft and clothing design fan who has been writing about these interests for years.

I have spent many hours studying knitting, weaving, sewing, embroidery, and quilting as well as learning about various brands and models of sewing gear and machines. In addition to this research, my work involves publishing information related to these topics in ways that will be informative for both amateur crafters like me and more experienced sewers!