What Is An I-Cord Edge In Knitting?

An I-cord edge is a type of finish that can be added to knitting projects. It’s made by using a small, circular needle to knit a narrow tube of stitches. This tube is then sewn onto the edge of the project.

The result is a neat, tidy edge that has a bit of extra structure and stability. I-cord edges can be used on all sorts of projects, from sweaters to blankets to bags.

Knitting Help – i-Cord Side Edging

An I-cord edge is a type of edging that is often used in knitting. It is made by using a small, circular needle to create a cord-like edge. This edge can be used to finish off the edges of garments, or it can be used as an embellishment.

I-Cord Edge on Garter Stitch

An I-cord edge on garter stitch is a great way to finish off your knitting project. It’s easy to do and it gives your project a nice, professional looking finish. Here’s how to do it:

1. Cast on the number of stitches you need for your I-cord. For example, if you’re knitting a scarf that is 60 stitches wide, you’ll need to cast on 60 stitches for your I-cord. 2. Knit 2 rows of garter stitch.

3. To make the I-cord edge, knit 1 stitch, then slip the next stitch purlwise onto the right hand needle without knitting it (this creates an “I” shape). Repeat this until you have 1 stitch left on the left hand needle. Then pass the last stitch over the first stitch and off the needle (this creates a corded effect).

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4. Continue in this manner until you reach the end of your row or until you’ve reached the desired length of your I-cord edge.

What Is An I-Cord Edge In Knitting?

Credit: blog.tincanknits.com

How Do I Install an I-Cord Edge?

An I-cord edge is a great way to finish off the edges of a project. It’s simple to do and it gives your project a nice, clean look. Here’s how to install an I-cord edge:

1. Start by casting on the number of stitches you need for your I-cord. For example, if you’re working with a worsted weight yarn and you want your I-cord to be about 1/2 inch wide, you’ll need to cast on 4 stitches. 2. Next, knit the stitches onto a double pointed needle (or two circular needles).

You’ll now have one stitch on each end of the needle(s). 3. Without turning your work, slide the stitches to the other end of the needle(s). You should now have two empty needles and two full needles.

4. Insert your right hand needle into the first stitch on the left hand needle as if you were going to knit it. Then, take your left hand needle and pull it through that same stitch (as if you were making an I-cord knot). Now slide that stitch off of the left hand needle – you’ve made one slip knot!

Repeat this process until all of the stitches are slip knotted onto the right hand needle – don’t turn your work! Now that all of your stitches are on one needle, it’s time to start knitting them as an I-cord! To do this, simply knit every stitch until you reach the desired length for your I-cord edging.

Then bind off all of the stitches and weave in any loose ends. That’s it – you’re done!

What is an I-Cord in Knitting?

An i-cord is a small tube of knitting that is created by working stitches back and forth on a double-pointed needle. It can be used to create decorative edging on a garment or as a tie for fastening two pieces of fabric together.

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To knit an i-cord, you will need a length of yarn and a pair of double-pointed needles.

Cast on the desired number of stitches onto one needle. *Without turning your work, slide the stitches to the other end of the needle so that the working yarn is at the opposite end from where it started.* Next, insert the empty needle into the first stitch on the left-hand needle as if to knit it, but don’t actually knit it – just leave it sitting on the needle.

Now reach around with your right hand and grab the working yarn from behind (so that it’s coming towards you), then use this yarn to knit the next stitch as normal. Continue in this way until all stitches have been worked, then turn your work and repeat from *. As you work each row, you will see that a tube starts to form.

You can make your i-cord as long or short as you like – just keep repeating those steps until it’s the size you want!

How Do You Stop an I-Cord Edge?

An I-cord is a great way to finish off the edge of a project. It gives it a nice, clean look and can be used on projects like sweaters, afghans, scarves, and more. To stop an I-cord edge, simply knit two stitches together at the end of the row.

This will create a gap that you can thread your yarn through to secure the I-cord.

How Do You Pick Up Stitches on I-Cord Edge?

If you’re looking to pick up stitches along an I-cord edge, there are a few things to keep in mind. First, you’ll need to decide which side of the I-cord you want the stitches to be facing. If you’re working with a knit stitch, you’ll want to pick up the stitches from the right side; if you’re working with a purl stitch, you’ll want to pick them up from the wrong side.

Second, use a tapestry needle or other blunt-tipped needle to avoid splitting the yarn as you work. Finally, take care not to pull too tightly on the I-cord as you pick up the stitches; doing so could cause it to become misshapen.

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To begin, insert your needle into the first stitch of the I-cord (again, from either the right or wrong side depending on your stitch pattern).

Then simply knit or purl one stitch for each loop along the edge of the cord. As you work your way around, be sure to keep an even tension so that your cord doesn’t get twisted or otherwise misshapen. When you reach the end of the cord, slip your last stitch off of your needle and voila – you’ve now picked up stitches along an I-cord edge!

Conclusion

An I-cord edge is a type of finish that can be added to a knitting project. It creates a nice, clean edge and can also be used as decorative detail. To create an I-cord edge, you will need to use a small circular needle and some scrap yarn.

The first step is to knit a few stitches onto the needle using the scrap yarn. Next, you will slip these stitches back to the beginning of the needle and knit them again. Continue this process until you have enough I-cord to go around the edge of your project.

You can then bind off the I-cord and weave in any ends.

Jane
Jane

Hi,
I’m Jane and I’m the editor of janesknittingkits.com! I am a long-time craft and clothing design fan who has been writing about these interests for years.

I have spent many hours studying knitting, weaving, sewing, embroidery, and quilting as well as learning about various brands and models of sewing gear and machines. In addition to this research, my work involves publishing information related to these topics in ways that will be informative for both amateur crafters like me and more experienced sewers!