What Is Continental Knitting?

Do you knit Continental or English? If you don’t know what I’m talking about, let me explain. In Continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand and the working needle is in the right hand.

The yarn is wrapped around the needle from front to back to form a stitch.

How to knit for beginners – the continental way (+ slow motion)

If you’re a knitting enthusiast, you’ve probably heard of continental knitting. But what exactly is it? Continental knitting is a style of knitting that is typically faster than the more traditional English style.

In continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand, and the needles are worked with the right hand. This can take some getting used to if you’re used to holding the yarn in your right hand, but many people find it to be a more efficient way of knitting. There are a few different ways to hold the yarn when continental knitting.

The most common way is to wrap the yarn around your pinky finger and hold it under your other fingers. This tension method allows you to control the tension of your stitches better and produce even knit fabric. If you’re looking to increase your speed or just want to try something new, give continental knitting a try!

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Continental Vs English Knitting

There are two main types of knitting: continental and English. Both have their own unique benefits that can make your knitting experience either more enjoyable or easier, depending on your preference. Continental knitting is the most popular form of knitting in Europe and is often considered to be the faster of the two methods.

In continental knitting, the yarn is held in the left hand and the needles are manipulated with the right. This method can be less tiring on the hands and wrists since there is less movement overall. It can also be helpful for those who knit tightly, as it can create a looser tension.

English knitting, on the other hand, is more popular in North America and Britain. In this method, the yarn is held in the right hand and needles are moved with the left. This may feel more comfortable for some people since it mirrors how we write.

English knitters also often find that they have more control over their tension when using this method.

What Is Continental Knitting?

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What is Continental Knitting Vs English?

There are two main types of knitting: continental and English. Both styles have their own unique benefits, so it’s really up to the individual knitter to decide which one they prefer. Continental knitting is often faster than English knitting, as the yarn is held in the left hand and the stitches are formed using a picking motion.

This style of knitting is also known as “picking” or “German” knitting. English knitting, on the other hand, is also known as “throwing”. In this style, the yarn is held in the right hand and the needles are manipulated using a throwing motion.

Many knitters find this style of knitting to be more relaxing, as it doesn’t require as much coordination between hands.

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How Do You Do the Continental Method in Knitting?

The Continental method in knitting is done by holding the working yarn in your left hand and using a picking motion with your right needle to draw the yarn through the stitch. The advantage of this method is that it is faster than the English method, which uses a throwing motion with the right needle.

Why is It Called Continental Knitting?

There are a few different theories as to why knitting is called continental knitting, but the most likely explanation is that it comes from Europe. The word “continental” can be used to describe anything from or relating to the European continent, so it makes sense that continental knitting would come from there. It’s also worth noting that continental knitting is sometimes referred to as Germanic knitting, which further supports the theory that it originated in Europe.

So why is continental knitting called that? Most likely because it came from Europe!

How Do You Knit a Continental Method for Beginners?

Continental knitting is a method of knitting in which the yarn is held in the left hand. This method is often used by European knitters and results in a slightly different tension than English style knitting, which is more common in the United States. Because continental knitting keeps the working yarn at your side, it can be faster than other methods once you get the hang of it.

It also tends to be more ergonomic, placing less strain on the hands and wrists. If you’re a complete beginner, start by holding the yarn in your left hand with your thumb and first two fingers. The needle that you are not currently using should be held in your right hand.

To make a knit stitch, insert the right-hand needle into the front of the next stitch on the left-hand needle from bottom to top. Then wrap the yarn around the right-hand needle (counterclockwise if you’re right handed, clockwise if you’re left handed), and pull through to create a new stitch on the right-hand needle. You’ve now completed one knit stitch!

Continue until you have worked all stitches off of the left-hand needle or until you reach end of your row or round.

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When working purl stitches continental style, hold the yarn in your left hand as usual but insert the needle from top to bottom instead of bottom to top when working each stitch. Otherwise, follow all steps for making knit stitches as described above.

Conclusion

Continental knitting is a style of knitting in which the yarn is held in the left hand. This style is also sometimes called German knitting or left-handed knitting. Continental knitting is faster than traditional English knitting, and it can be easier on the hands and wrists since there is less movement involved.

Many professional knitters use the continental style, and it is often used in competitive speed knitting.

Jane
Jane

Hi,
I’m Jane and I’m the editor of janesknittingkits.com! I am a long-time craft and clothing design fan who has been writing about these interests for years.

I have spent many hours studying knitting, weaving, sewing, embroidery, and quilting as well as learning about various brands and models of sewing gear and machines. In addition to this research, my work involves publishing information related to these topics in ways that will be informative for both amateur crafters like me and more experienced sewers!