What Is Grainline In Sewing?

Grainline is the direction of the fabric’s weave. The grainline runs parallel to the selvage and is perpendicular to the crossgrain. When cutting out a pattern, you want to make sure that the grainline is running in the same direction on all pieces.

This will ensure that your garment hangs correctly and doesn’t end up looking like it was made for a doll.

What Is… The Grainline?

The grainline of a fabric is the line that runs parallel to the selvedge, or finished edge of the fabric. When you are cutting out a pattern piece, you want to make sure that the grainline is running perpendicular to the fold of the fabric. This will ensure that your garment hangs properly and doesn’t end up looking wonky.

How to Find Grainline on Fabric

When you are cutting out a pattern, it is important to know where the grainline is. The grainline is the direction of the fabric’s weave. It usually runs parallel to the selvage (the finished edge of the fabric).

To find the grainline, first locate the selvage. Then, gently pull on the fabric until it starts to bias (stretch out of shape). The direction that it stretches is the crossgrain.

The grainline runs perpendicular to the crossgrain. Once you have located the grainline, use a straight pin to mark it on the fabric. Then cut along this line when cutting out your pattern pieces.

READ MORE:  Why Does My Sewing Machine Keep Jamming?
What Is Grainline In Sewing?

Credit: sewguide.com

Which Way is the Grainline on Fabric?

There are a couple different ways to determine the grainline on fabric. The first way is to look at the selvage, or finished edge of the fabric. The grainline will run perpendicular to the selvage.

Another way to determine the grainline is to fold the fabric in half lengthwise and align the raw edges. The grainline will run parallel to the folded edge.

How Do You Find the Grainline?

There are a few different ways that you can find the grainline of a fabric. The first way is to simply look at the selvage, or finished edge, of the fabric and see which way the threads are running. The grainline will always run perpendicular to the selvage.

Another way to find the grainline is to hold the fabric up to a light source, like a window. You should be able to see the individual threads running through the fabric. The direction that these threads are running is parallel to the grainline.

If you’re still having trouble finding the grainline, you can try folding the fabric in half lengthwise and widthwise and pressing it lightly with your fingers. Once you’ve done this, you should be able to feel which direction the threads are running and subsequently locate the grainline.

Is Grainline Parallel to Selvage?

No, grainline is not always parallel to selvage. Selvage is the edge of fabric that is finished and will not unravel or fray, while grainline refers to the threads that run perpendicular to selvage. Depending on how a fabric is woven, the grainline could be slightly angled from the selvage.

READ MORE:  What Is A Notion In Sewing?

Is Grainline the Same As Stretch?

No, grainline and stretch are not the same thing. Grainline is the direction of the fabric’s grain, which runs parallel to the selvage. The stretch of a fabric is how much it can be stretched before it breaks.

Conclusion

Grainline is an important concept in sewing. It refers to the direction of the fabric’s grain, or the direction in which the threads are woven. The grainline affects the drape and hang of a garment, and it’s important to know how to identify and work with it.

In this post, we’ll take a look at what grainline is, how to identify it, and some tips for working with it.

Jane
Jane

Hi,
I’m Jane and I’m the editor of janesknittingkits.com! I am a long-time craft and clothing design fan who has been writing about these interests for years.

I have spent many hours studying knitting, weaving, sewing, embroidery, and quilting as well as learning about various brands and models of sewing gear and machines. In addition to this research, my work involves publishing information related to these topics in ways that will be informative for both amateur crafters like me and more experienced sewers!