What Is Negative Ease In Knitting?

Negative ease is when your garment measurements are smaller than your body measurements. Negative ease creates a fitted look and is often used in garments such as sweaters and socks. To calculate negative ease, you will need to take your body measurement and subtract it from the garment measurement.

For example, if your chest measures 40” and the sweater you want to knit has a chest measurement of 38”, then the negative ease would be 2”.

Understanding Positive and Negative Ease in Knitting Patterns and How to Choose Your Size

Negative ease is a term used in knitting to describe a garment that is meant to be worn snugly. It is created by using a smaller needle than what is recommended for the yarn, and results in a garment that is slightly smaller than your actual body measurements. Negative ease can also be achieved by knitting with a tight gauge.

The most common garments that are knit with negative ease are sweaters, hats, and gloves. When choosing a pattern, you will want to take your body measurements and then choose a size that is 2-4 inches smaller than your actual measurements. This will ensure that the finished garment will have the desired fit.

Negative Ease Formula

Negative ease is a term used in sewing and knitting to describe how much smaller an item is than the body measurements it’s meant to fit. The formula for negative ease is simple: body measurement minus finished garment measurement. For example, if your bust measures 40 inches and you’re making a sweater with a finished bust measurement of 38 inches, the negative ease would be 2 inches.

Why bother with negative ease? Because it results in a garment that’s snugger and more fitted than one made with zero or positive ease. That can be desirable for some garments, like form-fitting sweaters, dresses, and coats.

It can also help certain fabrics look and feel better, like ribbing on a sweater or quilting on a jacket. And finally, it can account for shrinkage that might occur during washing or wearing.

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Keep in mind that every person and every body is different, so you’ll need to experiment to find the amount of negative ease that works best for you.

And remember, too much negative ease can make a garment uncomfortable or even unwearable!

What Is Negative Ease In Knitting?

Credit: nomadicknits.com

How Do You Calculate Negative Ease in Knitting?

Negative ease is a term used in knitting to describe a garment that is smaller than the body it is meant to fit. This can be achieved by using a smaller needle size, or by working fewer stitches and rows per inch. It results in a garment that is snugger fitting than one made with no negative ease.

To calculate negative ease, you need to know the finished measurement of the garment and the desired measurement of the body it will fit. For example, if you want to make a sweater with a finished chest circumference of 36 inches (91 cm), but your actual chest measurement is 38 inches (96 cm), you would need 2 inches (5 cm) of negative ease. To get this number, simply subtract your actual chest measurement from the desired finished measurement of the garment.

In this case, 38-36=2. Keep in mind that some garments are meant to have negative ease built into their design, such as form-fitting sweaters and close-fitting gloves. Other garments, like loose-fitting cardigans or baggy hats, may not require any negative ease at all.

It really depends on the design of the garment and how fitted you want it to be.

What are Two Types of Ease?

According to the dictionary, ease is defined as “freedom from difficulty, pain, or hardship.” When it comes to creating ease in our lives, there are two main types: mental and physical. Mental ease is when we feel relaxed and at peace with ourselves.

This can be achieved through meditation, journaling, or simply spending time in nature. It’s important to find activities that help you clear your mind and de-stress. For some people, this may mean taking up a new hobby like painting or hiking.

Others find that listening to calm music or reading fiction helps them achieve mental ease.

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Physical ease is when our bodies feel relaxed and comfortable. This can be achieved through massage, yoga, or other forms of exercise.

It’s important to find activities that help you release tension and improve flexibility. For some people, this may mean going for a run or taking a hot bath. Others find that stretching or getting regular massages helps them achieve physical ease.

Both mental and physical ease are important for overall well-being.

How Do You Add a Negative Ease?

Adding negative ease to a garment is the process of making it slightly smaller than the wearer’s body measurements. This is done to create a snug fit that is comfortable and doesn’t restrict movement. Negative ease can be added by altering the pattern, or by choosing a smaller size when sewing.

There are two main ways to add negative ease to a garment: by altering the pattern, or by choosing a smaller size when sewing. If you’re altering the pattern, you’ll need to make sure that all of the pieces are reduced in size equally. The easiest way to do this is to trace the pattern onto tracing paper, then cut out each piece along the new lines.

You can also use a ruler or tape measure to mark out the new dimensions on the existing pattern pieces. If you’re adding negative ease by choosing a smaller size when sewing, you’ll need to take care when cutting out your fabric pieces. Make sure that you cut them all according to the measurements for the smaller size, rather than using your own measurements.

This will ensure that your finished garment has negative ease built into it.

What Does Ease Mean on Knitting Patterns?

When you see the word “ease” in a knitting pattern, it simply means that there is extra room built into the garment to allow for a comfortable fit. In other words, if the finished garment measurements are 40 inches around, but the pattern only calls for 38 inches of actual knitting, then there is 2 inches of ease built into the design.

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Ease can also refer to the amount of negative space created by a certain stitch pattern.

For example, a lacy stitch might have more ease than a dense stitch, because it has larger holes and creates more drape. In general, you should choose a size based on your actual body measurements, not on the finished garment measurements. If you’re between sizes or if you want a looser/drapier fit, then go up to the next size.

And if you want a tighter/more fitted look, then go down to the smaller size.

Conclusion

If you’re a new knitter, you may have come across the term “negative ease” and been wondering what it means. Negative ease is simply when your garment is meant to be smaller than your body measurements. This might sound like a bad thing, but it can actually be quite flattering!

For example, let’s say you want to knit a sweater that has negative ease of 2 inches. That means that the finished sweater will be 2 inches smaller than your actual chest measurement. So, if your chest measures 40 inches, you would knit the sweater to measure 38 inches around.

When choosing a pattern that has negative ease, it’s important to pick one that is sized correctly. If you choose a size that is too small, the garment will be uncomfortable to wear. But if you choose a size that is too large, the negative ease won’t have the desired effect and the garment may look sloppy.

Generally speaking, negative ease works best with close-fitting garments such as sweaters and dresses. It can also be used for accessories like scarves and hats. So next time you see a pattern with negative ease, don’t be afraid to give it a try!

Jane
Jane

Hi,
I’m Jane and I’m the editor of janesknittingkits.com! I am a long-time craft and clothing design fan who has been writing about these interests for years.

I have spent many hours studying knitting, weaving, sewing, embroidery, and quilting as well as learning about various brands and models of sewing gear and machines. In addition to this research, my work involves publishing information related to these topics in ways that will be informative for both amateur crafters like me and more experienced sewers!